MirrorsMonoprintsSilkscreensEtchingsArchiveView All
Available Works
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Are You Out Of Your Fucking Mind? 2018
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Go Away!!!
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Top Dog, 2017
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Do I Have To Draw You A Picture
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Gobbledygook
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Nothing
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Language Is Not Transparent
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The Joys of Yiddish
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Silence, 2013
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Scoundrel, 2010
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Thank You!
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I Don't Get It/I Still Don't Get It
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Aggravate, 2010
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Power, 2010
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Criticize, 2010
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Liar, 2010
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Installation View, 4 Etchings
Archive
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Top Dog, 2018
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Nothing
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Amazing, (inverse)
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It Doesn't Get Any Better Than This
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Liar, 2013
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Amazing
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Go Away, 2012
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Chuckle, 2013
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It Doesn't Get Any Better Than This!, 2013
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Know What I Mean?, 2013
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Are You Out Of Your Fucking Mind?, 2013
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Do I Have To Draw You A Picture?, 2013
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Talk Is Cheap, 2012
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Everybody Is Full Of Shit, 2012
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I've Had It Up To Here, 2012
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Photography Before The Age of Mechanical Reproduction
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Photography Before The Age Of Mechanical Reproduction, 2011
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Photography Before The Age Of Mechanical Reproduction, 2011
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Photography Before The Age Of Mechanical Reproduction, 2011
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Photography Before The Age Of Mechanical Reproduction, 2011
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Blah Blah Blah, 2010
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Obvious, 2013
Mel Bochner

Mel Bochner [born 1940] is recognized as one of the leading figures in the development of Conceptual art in New York in the 1960s and 1970s. Emerging at a time when painting was increasingly discussed as outmoded, Bochner became part of a new generation of artists which also included Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, and Robert Smithson - artists, whom, like Bochner were looking at ways of breaking with with Abstract Expressionism and traditional compositional devices. His pioneering introduction of the use of language in the visual, led Harvard University art historian Benjamin Buchloh to describe his 1966 Working Drawings as ‘probably the first truly conceptual exhibition’.


Bochner came of age during the second half of the 1960s, a moment of radical change, both in society at large as well as in art. While painting slowly lost its preeminent position in modern art, language moved from talking about art to becoming part of art itself. Bochner has consistently probed the conventions of both painting and of language, the way we construct and understand them, and the way they relate to one another to make us more attentive to the unspoken codes that underpin our engagement with the world.

- excerpted from Mel Bochner / If The Color Changes